Kathy Gannon

Friday Five: Remembering RHE, exiting Catholics, Pakistani Christian trafficking, fact-checking satire

Friday Five: Remembering RHE, exiting Catholics, Pakistani Christian trafficking, fact-checking satire

This is one of those weeks when I’m putting together Friday Five after not paying a whole lot of attention to the news.

So if I miss something really crucial, blame it on my “bucket list” baseball trip to see my beloved Texas Rangers play the Pittsburgh Pirates.

Pittsburgh’s PNC Park is the 23rd major-league stadium where I’ve seen a game. Of course, four of those ballparks (old Atlanta, New York Mets, St. Louis and Texas) no longer exist, so I have 11 left on my bucket list. The new Rangers stadium next year will make that 12. 

OK, that’s enough for now, but feel free to tweet me at @bobbyross for more baseball talk.

In the meantime, let’s dive into the (distracted) Friday Five:

1. Religion story of the week: Rachel Held Evans’ untimely death at age 37 was the major headline of the week.

The Washington Post’s Sarah Pulliam Bailey, the New York Times’ Elizabeth Dias, The Atlantic’s Emma Green, Religion News Service’s Emily McFarlan Miller and Slate’s Ruth Graham all covered the sad, sad news of Evans’ passing.

Here at GetReligion, Terry Mattingly wrote a post on the importance of focusing on doctrines, not political choices, in coverage of Evans’ legacy. And Julia Duin voiced her opinion that Evans’ death offered “a rare look at journalistic grief.”

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Religion figures heavily — and rightly so — in AP story on Muslim's 'honor' killing of sister

Religion figures heavily — and rightly so — in AP story on Muslim's 'honor' killing of sister

In the past, we at GetReligion have raised concerns about news stories failing to consider religion's role in "honor" killings.

As our own tmatt has pointed out, there is no need to dwell on the Islamic element of such crimes, and it would be wrong to suggest that all Muslims in Pakistan and elsewhere practice, accept or ignore "honor" killings. (Yes, the scare quotes are appropriate on this subject.)

But for the sake of full and accurate reporting, it's crucial that journalists note when religion provides the impetus for such killings.

The Associated Press' Kathy Gannon does an excellent job of that in an absolutely riveting story on a man who killed his sister in Pakistan.

The AP lede:

LAHORE, Pakistan (AP) — For two months, over the thunder of machines at the steel mill, the men taunted Mubeen Rajhu about his sister. Even now, they laugh at how easy it was to make him lose his temper.
Some people had seen Tasleem in their Lahore slum with a Christian man. She was 18, a good Muslim girl, out in public with a man. Even though the man had converted to Islam out of love for her, this couldn't be allowed.
"Some guys got to know that his sister was having a relationship," says Ali Raza, a co-worker at the mill. "They would say: 'Can't you do anything? What is the matter with you? You are not a man.'"
Raza can barely contain a smile as he talks about the hours spent needling Rajhu.

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